Subtle to severe hepatobiliary morbidity in Opisthorchis viverrini endemic settings in Southern Laos

Title
Subtle to severe hepatobiliary morbidity in Opisthorchis viverrini endemic settings in Southern Laos
Authors
Soukhathammavong, PA; Rajpho, V; Phongluxa, K; Vonghachack, Y; Hattendorf, J; Hongvanthong, B; Rasaphon, O; Sripa, B; Akkhavong, K; Hatz, C; Odermatt, P
Keywords
RISK-FACTORS; FLUKE INFECTIONS; HIGH PREVALENCE; LIVER; CHOLANGIOCARCINOMA; PROVINCE; PDR; EPIDEMIOLOGY; RESIDENTS; THAILAND
Issue Date
2015
Publisher
ACTA TROP
Citation
Acta Trop.;JAN;2015;141;
Abstract
Evidence of severe hepatobiliary morbidity associated with Opisthorchis viverrini liver fluke infection including cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is scarce in Laos although O. viverrini infection is highly prevalent. We assessed hepatobiliary morbidity using abdominal ultrasonography (US) in O. viverrini adult patients in Saravan province, Southern Laos. A random sample of 431 O. viverrini patients from 10 villages underwent abdominal US. Mild, moderate and markedly advanced periductal fibrosis was diagnosed in 7.0%, 66.5%, and 17.0% of patients, respectively. Normal liver parenchyma was seen in only 9.5% of patients. Presence of gall stones (13.2%), sludge (1.4%), gall wall thickening (1.2%), bile duct dilatation (1.6%), fatty liver (12.0%), kidney stones (8.6%) and cysts (7.9%) were diagnosed in considerable frequencies. In five patients (1.2%) hepatobiliary lesions suggesting CCA were diagnosed. Tumour markers, i.e. Interleukin-6, plasminogen activator inhibitor and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 were within normal range. The number of CCA suspected liver masses and hepatobiliary morbidity diagnosed among clinically asymptomatic adult patients in O. viverrini endemic area presents a major public health concern in Laos. However, definitive diagnosis of Opisthorchis-related severe sequelae including CCA is urgently needed to gauge the burden of this deadly disease in Laos. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/11267/2492
ISSN
0001-706X
Appears in Collections:
2.Ministry of Health > Journal articles
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