Critical interactions between Global Fund-supported programmes and health systems: a case study in Lao People's Democratic Republic

Title
Critical interactions between Global Fund-supported programmes and health systems: a case study in Lao People's Democratic Republic
Authors
Mounier-Jack, S; Rudge, JW; Phetsouvanh, R; Chanthapadith, C; Coker, R
Keywords
FRAMEWORK
Issue Date
2010
Publisher
HEALTH POLICY PLANN
Citation
Health Policy Plan.;NOV;2010;25;
Abstract
In Lao PDR, the HIV and TB programmes remain vertical and mostly weakly integrated with the general health system. However, Global Fund investments have extended the network of facilities delivering care at local level, resulting in greater integration with primary care and improved access for patients, particularly for TB. For HIV, as the prevalence remains low, services primarily target high-risk groups in urban areas. Less integrated functions include procurement and drug supply, and monitoring and evaluation. HIV and TB programmes are only starting to coordinate with each other. Global Fund-supported activities are generally integrated within the national disease programmes, except for monitoring and evaluation. In Lao PDR, the HIV and TB programmes remain vertical and mostly weakly integrated with the general health system. However, Global Fund investments have extended the network of facilities delivering care at local level, resulting in greater integration with primary care and improved access for patients, particularly for TB. For HIV, as the prevalence remains low, services primarily target high-risk groups in urban areas. Less integrated functions include procurement and drug supply, and monitoring and evaluation. HIV and TB programmes are only starting to coordinate with each other. Global Fund-supported activities are generally integrated within the national disease programmes, except for monitoring and evaluation. Synergies of Global Fund support with the health system include improved access to services, institutional strengthening and capacity building, improved family planning (with wider condom distribution through HIV/AIDS social marketing programmes), and the delivery of add-on interventions, such as vaccinations and health education, alongside Global Fund-supported interventions at community level. Unintended consequences concern the lack of alignment between national stated priorities (maternal and child health) and the strong focus of external partners, such as the Global Fund, on financing communicable disease programmes.
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/11267/2557
ISSN
0268-1080
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2.Ministry of Health > Journal articles
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